Category: Uncategorized

Book Review – Wilhelm Pruller, Diary of a German Soldier (New York, USA: Coward McCann, 1963)

The Diary of a German Soldier is the journal of Wilhelm Pruller kept during his service in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War. He served with the 10th and 11th Rifle Regiments, both formations part of the 9th Panzer Division.[1] Pruller served in both an infantry company and as part of the regimental staff […]

Book Review – James Roberts, Killer Butterflies – Combat, Psychology and Morale in the British 19th (Western) Division 1915–18 (Solihull: Helion, 2017)

The premise of James Robert’s book is fascinating and intriguing. His study has two objectives. Firstly, to examine what British infantrymen did during battle in the Great War, especially in relation to fighting and killing the enemy.[1][2] Secondly, to gauge the morale of the soldiers during major battles of the conflict.[3] The 19th (Western) Infantry […]

Book Review – Claus Neuber, Marching from Defeat (Barnsley: Pen & Sword, 2020)

Marching from Defeat: Surviving the Collapse of the German Army in the Soviet Union, 1944 is the personal narrative of German Army artillery Lieutenant Claus Neuber and his journey back to German lines after being trapped behind the Soviet positions. Neuber served in the 1st Battalion of the 18th Artillery Regiment that was part of […]

Book Review – Herbert Maeger, Lost Honour, Betrayed Loyalty (London: Frontline, 2018)

 Lost Honour, Betrayed Loyalty is the memoir of Herbert Maeger who fought with German forces during the Second World War. He initially joined the 1st SS Panzer Division “Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler” (LAH) in September 1941, forced to enlist to prevent action being taken against his mother who had made a derogatory remark about Hitler.[1] […]

Episode 11 of Season One of the Combat Morale Podcast is out today (17.3.22).

Dr Linsey Robb, Associate Professor in Modern British History at the University of Northumbria, talks about the motivation of the British civilian worker in WW2.You can listen here https://bit.ly/3KViBbxDuring the Second World War, The British government mobilised civilians more effectively than any other combatant nation. By 1944, a third of the civilian population were engaged in […]

Episode 10 of Season One of the Combat Morale Podcast is out today (10.3.22).

Recent doctoral graduate Dr Drew Ryder talks about the motivation and morale of the British Army combatant fighting in in Korea, 1950-53. You can listen here https://bit.ly/3hSTdXi In 1950, communist North Korea attacked its southern neighbour sparking a three year war that lasted until 1953 when an armistice was declared. Britain committed troops as part of […]

Episode 9 of Season One of the Combat Morale Podcast is out today (3.3.22)

Historian, lawyer and author Andrea Hetherington talks about her recent book on British Army deserters on the British home front during WW1. You can listen here (https://bit.ly/3HEHl5u)During that war, more than 80,000 cases of desertion were tried at a court martial on the home front. Andrea talks about the many motivations for absence or desertion […]

Book Review – Klaus Willmann [Lothar Herrmann], Death March Through Russia (Barnsley, Yorkshire/UK: GreenHill, 2019)

Death March Through Russia is the narrative that author Klaus Willman wrote of former German soldier Lothar Herrmann’s service in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War and subsequent time in captivity as a Soviet POW.[1] Herrmann was born in Breslau, modern-day Wroclaw in Poland, in September 1920 and he trained as a house painter […]

Downloads for the WFA’s Mentioned in Dispatches podcast for Q4, 2021

This post is an update on the hits for the Western Front Association’s weekly podcast Mentioned in Dispatches.   The podcast is available on a range of Apple and Android platforms through apps such as iTunes, Acast, Castbox. Stitcher and TuneIn.   Since February 2017 to end of December 2021, 240 episodes of the podcast […]

Book Review – Gunter Koschorrek, Blood Red Snow (Barnsley: Frontline, 2018)

This book is the diary turned memoir of Gunter Koschorrek who served on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. From October 1942 until August 1944, he served in the 1st Battalion, 21st Panzergrenadier Regiment, 24 Panzer Division, seeing action at Stalingrad, the Nikopol Bridgehead and in Romania. After that, he served with a […]

Book Review – Andreas Hartinger (ed), Until the Eyes Shut [memoir of Hans Kahr] (Warsaw, Poland: Amazon, 2019)

This book is the recollection of Han Kahr during his service as a machine gunner in the 138th Mountain Regiment, 3rd Mountain Division, between late 1943 to the end of the war.[1] Kahr was born in 1925 in Eastern Styria in Austria into an agricultural community where his father was a peasant farmer.[2] He enlisted […]

Book Review – Henry Metelmann, Through Hell for Hitler (Staplehurst: Spellmount, 1990)

Henry Metelmann’s memoir of his service in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War is one of the best accounts I have read. Metelmann served as a driver in the 22nd Panzer Division and saw action in the Crimea, Russia and Ukraine from the winter of 1941/2 until 1944 when he was injured. After that, […]

Book Review – Ernst Kern, War Diary 1941-45: A Report (New York: Vantage, 1993)

War Diary is Ernst Kern’s memoir of his service in the Wehrmacht on the Eastern Front from 1941 to 1944. He served as an infantryman and medical orderly with the 12 Company, 91st Mountain Regiment, 4th Mountain Division, and saw action in the Caucasus, Ukraine and Romania.[1] The narrative was compiled during 1945 while Kern […]

Book review – Konrad Jarausch (ed), Reluctant Accomplice [the letters of Konrad Jarausch] (Princeton/Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2011)

This book is an edited collection of around 350 letters sent by German NCO Konrad Jarausch during his active service. They cover the time from 1939 until his death of typhoid fever in Russia on 27 January 1942.[1] In September 1939, Jarausch was mobilised from the reserves to serve with the V/XI battalion of the […]

Book Review – Georg Grossjohann, Five Years, Four Fronts (New York/USA: Ballentine, 1999)

Five Years, Four Fronts is Georg Grossjohann’s memoir that covers his service in the Wehrmacht during the Second World War.   Grossjohann served with the 21st Infantry Division in Poland, 161st Division during the invasion of France, the 332nd Division during the time between the end of the French campaign and start of Operation Barbarossa […]

Book Review – George Raugh, Unlikely Warrior A Jewish Soldier in Hitler’s Army (New York: Macmillan, 2015)

George Raugh served as a telegraphist in the communications section of the 2nd Battalion,158th Infantry Regiment, 282nd Division of the Wehrmacht.[1] He saw service in western Ukraine and Romania from December 1943 until his capture by the Russians in August 1944. His story is remarkable as he was one-quarter Jewish and under German race laws […]

Book Review: Gottlob Bidermann, In Deadly Combat: A German Soldier’s Memoir of the Eastern Front (Kansas: University of Kansas, 2000)

Reading the marketing blurb on the flap copy for this book, it appeared to promise little more than a Sven Hassle action novel. The first paragraph tells that ‘in the hell that was World War II, the Eastern Front was its heart of fire and ice. Gottlob Herbert Bidermann served in that lethal theater from […]

Activity report for the Mentioned in Dispatches podcast, February 2017 to end of March 2021

Since February 2017 to end of December 2020, 202 episodes of the podcast have been broadcast. Between the launch of the podcast on 13 February, 2017 and the end of March 2021, podcast episodes have been downloaded 373, 897 times. The average number of downloads per programme is 1,851. The activity over the last four […]

Book Review – Friedrich Reiner Nieman, Feldpost [Denis Havel (Ed.)] (Stroud, Gloucestershire: Fonthill, 2016)

Feldpost is a collection of letters from Friedrich Reiner Niemann who served with the 58th Infantry Regiment that was part of the German 6th Infantry Division during the Second World War.[1] The correspondence covers his life and front line experiences on the Eastern Front from 1941 to 1945. Niemann came from a well to do […]

Book Review: Helmut Altner, Berlin Soldier (Stroud: History Press, 2008 [1948])

 Helmut Altner’s memoir covers his period as a 17-year-old conscript soldier fighting in the defence of Berlin from his enlistment on 29 March 1945 to his capture by Soviet forces on 3 May. He initially joined the Grenadier and Training Replacement Battalion 309 that was part of the 309th ‘Berlin’ Infantry Division formed in February […]

Book Review – Martin Poppel, Heaven & Hell, The War Diary of a German Paratrooper (Staplehurst: Spellmount, 1988)

  Martin Poppel’s Heaven and Hell is his account of his service in the German Fallschirmjaeger (Parachute hunters) during the Second World War. He enlisted in 1938 as a recruit in the 1st Parachute Division and saw action in Poland, Norway and Holland before being promoted to Second Lieutenant in December 1941.  Until October 1943, […]

Book Review: Herman Schmidt, Diary of a German Soldier 1939-1945 (Amazon, n.d.),

Herman Schmidt’s Diary of a German Soldier 1939-1945 is more a memoir rather than a diary; the title is misleading. Schmidt was drafted into the German army in September 1939 at the age of 39.[1] The majority of his service was in various menial roles around the horse supply unit for the 18th Army in […]

Book Review – John Stieber, Against the Odds (Dublin: Poolbeg Press, 2016)

John Stieber’s account covers his time as a private in the Herman Goring Division, fighting on the Eastern Front July in late 1944 and 1945. He was born in 1926 of Czech-Austrian parents and grew up in England and Ireland in the 1920s and 1930s as his father ran various sugar refineries. In 1939, aged […]

Book Review – William Lubbeck, At Leningrad’s Gates (Philadelphia, PA/USA: Casement, 2006)

This is the chronological memoir of William Lubbeck who served throughout the Second World War as a ranker and officer in the German 58th Infantry Division. He served as a forward observer for the heavy weapons support company (13th Company) of the 154th Infantry Regiment and he went onto command that formation. He saw service […]

Activity report for the Mentioned in Dispatches podcast, February 2017 to end of December 2020.

Since February 2017 to end of December 2020, 189 episodes of the podcast have been broadcast. Between the launch of the podcast on 13 February, 2017 and the end of December 2020, podcast episodes have been downloaded 346,741 times.  To date (31 December 2020), we have had 129,330 complete downloads and 217,411 partial downloads.   […]

Book review: Armin Scheiderbauer, Adventures in My Youth: A German Soldier on the Eastern Front, 1941-1945 (Solihull: Helion, 2003)

Armim Scheiderbauer was born in 1924 in Styria, south-east Austria, his father being a Protestant minister. In August 1941, Scheiderbauer was drafted into the German Army and became an officer cadet. From summer 1942, he served for all his time in uniform as an infantry officer with the 252nd Infantry Division where he was a […]

The Combat Morale Podcast

I have established a new podcast titled the Combat Morale Podcast. It aims to explore what makes combatants fight (or not) in armed conflict. The podcast has a very broad remit covering all conflicts, asymmetric and conventional and seeks to be multidisciplinary hosting interviews with experts drawn from psychology, sociology, history policy and the armed […]

A ‘mere six weeks’? A comparative study re-examining the longevity of infantry officers’ frontline service during the Great War

My latest article in War in History examines the length of time officers actually served in infantry units during the Great War Veteran testimony after the Great War and current popular legend states that regimental officers in frontline infantry battalions during the Great War served around six weeks before death or injury ended their service. […]

Book Review – Uwe Timm, In My Brother’s Shadow (London: Bloomsbury, 2005)

Uwe Timm’s book explores the life of his brother Franz-Heinz, a member of the Waffen SS and the impact Franz-Heinz’s death had on his parents and Uwe’s relationship with them in post-war West Germany.   Born in 1940, Uwe was the youngest of three siblings in a middle-class Hamburg family. Franz-Heinz was Uwe’s senior by […]

Book Review – Alfred Novonty, The Good Soldier (Bedford, Penn: Aberjona, 2003)

This book is the memoir of Austrian Alfred Novotny that covers his service in the Wehrmacht from 1942 to 1945 and subsequent time as a post-war Soviet captive. Novotny was born in Vienna on 1 April 1924. His father was a truck driver for a diary and also an active Social Democrat.[1] Before the war, […]

Book Review – Hans Heinz Rehfeldt, Mortar Gunner on the Eastern Front Vols 1 &2 (Barnsley: Greenhill, 2019)

Hans Heinz Rehfeldt served on the eastern front during World War II. He joined the Reinforced Infantry Battalion Grossdeutschland in November 1941 and remained with this formation when it was expanded into a full division until the end of the war when he was captured by the Americans in May 1945. He initially joined a […]

Book Review – Hans Schäufler, Panzers on the Vistula (Barnsley: Pen & Sword, 2018).

Hans Schäufler was a signals officer and second lieutenant in 35th Panzer Regiment, 4th Panzer Division, on the Eastern Front. His account covers his experience of the war from January to May, 1945. He took part in the German retreat from Latvia to East Prussia and was trapped in Danzig when the city fell to […]

Downloads for the Mentioned in Dispatches podcast – to end of September 2020

Since February 2017 to end of September 2020, 178 episodes of the podcast have been broadcast. The podcast is available on a range of Apple and Android platforms through apps such as iTunes, Acast, Spotify, Castbox. Stitcher and TuneIn. Between the launch of the podcast on 13 February, 2017 and the end of September 2020, […]

Book Review Christine Alexander & Mason Kunze, Eastern Inferno, The Journals of a German Panzerjager on the Eastern Front, 1941-1943 [Hans Roth] (Oxford: Casement, 2010)

Hans Roth was a private and corporal in the anti-tank battalion of the 299th Division and served with them from the start of Operation Barbarossa in June 1941 to his death in June 1944. During his service, he fought with Sixth Army that was part of Army Group South and took part in operations to […]

Book Review – Willy Peter Reese, A Stranger to Myself: The Inhumanity of War, 1941-1944 (New York, USA: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005)

  A Stranger to Myself is the manuscript that German soldier Willy Peter Reese compiled on his service on the Eastern Front. It is a memoir that he wrote on his last home leave to Germany in early 1944 before he returned to the front where he subsequently disappeared and was  presumed killed.[1] He subtitled […]

Book Review: Horst Fuchs Richardson (Ed.), Your Loyal and Loving Son: The Letters of Tank Gunner Karl Fuchs, 1937-41. (Washington: Brassey’s, 2003)

The letters of Karl Fuchs present a different view of the German soldier in the Second World War than is frequently portrayed in the crude caricatures represented in British popular culture. There are three types of German serviceman that occupy this genre and all are demonstrated in the 1963 film, The Great Escape that portrays […]

Book Review: Oskar Scheja, The Man in the Black Fur Coat (Privately published, 2014)

Oskar Scheja’s account covers his time as a German soldier and Soviet POW during the Second World war. He rode with German forces into Russia in June 1941 as part of the 5th Company, 2nd Battalion, 525 Infantry Brigade, 298th Infantry Division.[1] In October 1942, he was transferred to the 164th  Infantry Division after being […]

Book Review: Armin Bottger, To the Gate of Hell (London: Frontline, 2012)

Armin Bottger was a radio operator in the German Army during the Second World fighting in Panzer IV tanks. He served as a private in the 12th Squadron, 24th Panzer Regiment that was part of the 24th Panzer Division that saw action in France, Italy and Eastern Front from 1943 until the summer of 1944. […]

Book Review – Bruno Friesen, Panzer Gunner (Mechanicsburg, PA, USA: Stackpole, 2008)

Bruno Friesen’s memoir covers his time as a gunner in Wehrmacht during the Second World War. He saw action with the 8th Company of the 25th Panzer Regiment from July 1944 until he was wounded in March 1945. Throughout his time with the unit, he served as part of the 7th Panzer Division and saw […]

Book Review – David Garden & Kenneth Andrew (Eds), The War Diaries of a Panzer Soldier, Erich Hager with the 17th Panzer Division on the Russian Front, 1941-1945 (Atglen PA/USA: Schiffer Military History, 2010)

David Garden and Kenneth Andrew have done a sterling effort to present, translate and present the diaries that German soldier Erich Hager kept for most of his service on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. Hager served as a ranker and Unteroffizier [Lance Sergeant] in 39th Panzer Regiment, 17th Panzer Division, throughout the […]

Downloads for the Mentioned in Dispatches podcast – to end of June 2020

Since February 2017 to the end of June 2020, 168 episodes of the podcast have been broadcast. The podcast is available on a range of Apple and Android platforms through apps such as iTunes, Acast, Spotify, Castbox. Stitcher and TuneIn. Between the launch of the podcast on 13 February, 2017 and the end of June […]

Downloads for the Mentioned in Dispatches podcast – to end of March 2020

Since February 2017 to end of March 2020, 154 episodes of the podcast have been broadcast. The podcast is available on a range of Apple and Android platforms through apps such as including iTunes, Acast and Castbox. Stitcher and TuneIn. Between the launch of the podcast on 13 February, 2017 and the end of March […]

Book review: K.W. Noe, Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army after 1861 (Chapel Hill, 2010)

Kenneth Noe’s book examines those Confederate volunteers who were so-called ‘late enlisters’, those who joined the southern army after the rage militare of 1861 had died down.[1] He estimates that 180,000 joined up after 1861 and this group of men are neglected by historians and stereotyped as hesitant non-slave owning farmers. His book aims to […]

Book Review: G. Hamilton, McNamara’s Folly: The Use of Low-IQ Troops in the Vietnam War (Infinity Publishing, 2015)

Gregory Hamilton’s revealing book examines the Project 100,000 personnel selection policy introduced by Secretary of State of Defense Robert McNamara during the Vietnam War. The programme formally accepted men into the army who were previous ‘disqualified for military service under previous mental [and physical] standards’ by lowering ‘test score[s] and educational standards’ required for service.[1] […]

Book Review – George Lepre, Fragging: Why U.S. Soldiers Assaulted Their Officers in Vietnam (Lubbock, Tx, 2011)

George Lepre’s excellent book is the first academic study into the Vietnam War phenomenon known as ‘fragging’, where US servicemen sought to murder other American soldiers using fragmentation grenades. He estimates there were up to 1,000 attacks that resulted in at least 57 deaths. His publication examines why soldiers perpetrated these crimes and how the […]